Caring for your cat

Below are listed many of the ‘physical’ needs of your cat. But please remember our cats have other needs such as an environment to stimulate their mind, areas to run and play and above all quality time from you their guardian. Please refer to our fact sheet entitled “Entertaining your Feline Friend” for these other needs of our feline companions.

GROOMING.

Most short-haired and semi short-haired breeds require only weekly brushing to keep their coat in good condition. Longhaired cats on the other hand will often become matted within a few days if proper grooming is not carried out. If the coat is neglected for any period of time the cat, may suffer from skin infections. Long haired cats generally require daily grooming, if you are not prepared to do this, you should consider a short haired breed or alternatively regular clipping to keep the coat short.

CARE OF CLAWS.

Generally cats claws do not need clipping. Cats have an instinctive behaviour to sharpen their claws and we recommend you provide them with their own scratching post or alternative site to carry out this activity. If problems develop or you have concerns discuss the matter with your Vet.

CARE OF EARS.

The majority of cats will not suffer with ear problems despite their owners taking no specific care of their ears. Cats that do suffer ear problems commonly benefit from having their ears cleaned regularly with an Ear Cleaning Solution. Remember that it is very important to ensure that there is no underlying ‘problem’ before you use the ear cleaner so always take your cat to your Vet first as you may find more specific treatment is required.

CARE OF EYES.

Unless you have flat faced cat you will seldom have to clean their eyes. A small amount of ‘dirt’ in the corners of their eyes is normal and should be removed with a damp tissue. Flat-faced cats on the other hand need regular eye cleaning and checking and may often suffer from blocked tear ducts - your Vet should examine this.

CARE OF TEETH.

Teeth should be checked regularly for tartar build-up as this can lead to decay and ultimately tooth loss. Try to prevent this build up by feeding hard, dry food and providing your cat with raw chicken wings to chew. There are now specially formulated dental diets available for cats. Your Vet can advise you on these diets. Your Veterinarian can remove any tartar, which does form on your cats teeth - this should be checked at your annual vaccination.

DIET.

Feeding commercial cat food is often the best option as these are usually completely balanced diets that supply your cat with everything they need. Milk is generally considered unnecessary for cats as many are lactose intolerant and the addition of milk to their diet will commonly result in diarrhoea. A general rule is that most cats will not eat more than they need and they like to eat small quantities frequently throughout the day. As previously mentioned, raw chicken wings are good for their dental health but these are best introduced at a young age of the cat may refuse to eat them. Clean, cool drinking water should be available at all times.

WORMING.

A cat should generally receive an intestinal worming tablet every 2 weeks from 2 weeks of age to 16 weeks of age, then monthly to 6 months, then every 3 months for the rest of its life. Monthly heartworm prevention is also available from your vet.

VACCINATION.

Vaccination regimes are complex and may vary with the vaccines used, your local area and the cats ages. The best advice is to discus this with your Veterinarian as soon as you have a new addition to your family. As a kitten, vaccinations are commonly given at: -
6 - 8 weeks of age
10 - 12 weeks of age
14 - 16 weeks of age
Then yearly boosters from then on:.

Vaccination regimes are complex and may vary with the vaccines used, your local area and the cats ages. The best advice is to discus this with your Veterinarian as soon as you have a new addition to your family. As a kitten, vaccinations are commonly given at: -
There are currently different types of vaccinations. These include: -
1. F (feline) 3 - Which protects against both forms of cat flu and feline enteritis.
2. F (feline) 4 - Which protects against both forms of cat flu, feline enteritis and chlamydia.
3. F (feline) 5 - Which protects against both forms of cat flu, feline enteritis, chlamydia and feline leukaemia.

FLEAS.

There are a variety of Feline Flea control products available, monthly spot ons, flea collars, flea powder, flea rinses and flea sprays. You should discuss these with your Vet and decide which is best for you and your cat.

Australian Pet Brands | Ingleburn 12 Williamson Road, Ingleburn NSW 2565 Australia | p: +61 2 9605 7377 | f: +61 2 9605 9564 | e: enquiries@austpetbrands.com.au